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to have full employment, given that? we did not have large budget deficits. what makes it so much harder? and it's adding up. it gives the persistent trade deficit. we used to not have one and now we do, and it is a big drag on the economy. the trade deficit is significantly down. we have had some -- the u.s. has actually become more competitive, but that's a front on which we need to work. there is a -- the trouble is the political debate has not kept up with the reality. at it all about china. actually, china is no longer the core of that. it's a much broader set of countries. those need to be work on. i hope the next president, instead of not just crude china bashing but what to do to have a world that is no -- we don't have everybody trying to run a trade surplus, which the germans believe is possible but the rest of us don't. then the issue of trade and income inequality, and a lot of -- used to be we traded with countries that were similar. and that presumably had relatively effect on income. if you make -- if you send auto parts to canada and conditioned sends assembled cars back
an incredible plan to get on top of debt and deficit, to show how we will pay our way in the world we have record low interest rates. low interest rates described by the shatter chancellor as a key test of economic credibility. >> ed miller band? >> can i start by joining the prime minister in paying tribute to walter berry of first battalion richmond of scotland. he should yet most courage and bravery and all our thoughts and condolences are for his family and friends. can also express my deep or about loss of life in israel and gaza in recent days including the latest polling terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. there's widespread support on all sides of the house for an immediate and durable cease-fire being agreed in israel and gaza. will the prime minister set out in his view their main barriers to the cease-fire agreement now being reached? >> i agree with right hon. gentleman about the appalling news this morning about the terrorist attack on a bus in tel leave and also express our deep concern at the intolerable situation in southern israel and the grave loss of life in gaza. yes
said the deficit and the state of american society. that is exactly right. you can look at questions of the budget and questions of infrastructure and immigration policy but above all education policy because this is the future and we are not talking about physical infrastructure but human infrastructure and joel is someone who has dedicated the most recent phase of his multi phase currier to this and when he is not discovering the best restaurants in brooklyn he is focused on improving a lot of young people in this country. so let me tell you how condi is dedicated to this issue. year-and-a-half i called her up and asked her to do something for me and with me. she said i'm too -- don't even go there. we have bet on many football games. before the end of this conversation you are going to agree to what is going to happen and she said no way. we at the council of foreign relations spend our time working on things like china, mexico, all the judicial foreign policy issues and we've moved our agenda and increasingly focusing on things domestic and what we want to do is a report on educa
. this agreement cuts the deficit by a trillion dollars, and it lays the groundwork for much more in the near future. we look forward to the work on the committee to make sure that millionaires and billionaires and corporate jet owners and people who have those yachts who get tax benefits, oil companies who get these huge tax subsidies, that that in the mix of thinking what goes on, that's what this select committee's going to be about. we need to do more for families. the number one job we have as a congress must be creating jobs for the american people. we, there are a number of things we're going to do. senator schumer's going to address that in a few minutes as to what jobs agenda we have. today we made sure america will pay its bills, now it's time to make sure that all americans can bay theirs. senator durbin? >> with this vote of 74-26, we have averted a crisis. america has avoided defaulting for the first time in our history on our national debt. the fears and concerns of americans across the board were considered by this congress, and as a result we've come together on a bipartisan b
debt today and deficit because in many ways it is in fact the spreading cancer. i call it that because occupation with a well diagnosed cancer, we know it's there and we know that it will spread and we know it can do. but we are now not operating as a prudent patient. too many americans are in fact choosing to ignore it. we are in some form of a state of denial. because if you think you are causing a crisis coming to americans have a false sense of security that everything is okay. there is no decisive action required today. we feel we can deal with it tomorrow. of course come in either of these two beliefs are true. what is certainly true as the federal government seems quite able to add $1 trillion each year to the national do. many people believe we can do this indefinitely. too many people actually believe this can go on for a decade after decade. they think so because one of the facts is as a country we can currently borrow money. my note to say 1.7%. but in fact last week it went down under 1.6%. that is kind of a happy state of affairs. we do not deserve to be able to borrow tha
that was as efficient we would have no deficit given the baby boom. >> >> it is actually called medicare. with the supreme act the of of, so all of these same of, so all of these same this but our budget problems will be done. >> cell it better dismantle. it is incredible. it is a rejection of theory and evidence. [laughter] that is pretty impressive. >> host: look at the interface between medical costs and the budget. the idea we have to have commissions like bowles simpson with the shares between spending and so forth. why don't we look at that in the eye? >> the riyal abbate of merck can -- american. the insurance industry is very influential. if you take one provision but to provide for egyptian dragon's for medicare. >> if anybody is serious about but we are they talked about i think health care reform should. medicare for all is where we should go broke teach teetwenty three. we had this plan is in an good to get to the effects of the single carrier system we should have a public option. then the public our action is killed. >> but right now is to establish the principle of univers
by which additional deficit reduction over a ten-year period would occur. and that process was after the trillion dollars was whacked off -- which it already has be been -- that a super committee of six from the house and six from the senate would deliberate and a majority vote of that committee of 12 could determine additional deficit reduction that would apply over the next ten years. and to give a little incentive for that super committee not to deadlock, the process of sequestration was set up which, in effect, was this meat cleaver that in a nondiscriminate way was going to drop a meat ax approach of another half trillion out of defense and a half trillion out of non-defense discretionary, which nobody wanted. and of which was never contemplated that it was going to go into effect, because the effects were going to be so onerous that surely people of goodwill could come together on a 12-member committee and not deadlock but instead at least one would provide the majority, even if it were only 7-5 out of the 12, because the alternative was so unpalatable. and, of course, we know
to fix this borrowing debt deficit issue in the book, vice president biden's chief of staff, talking about the economic crisis in 2011, that's exactly what is going on. there is so much evidence that it is the biggest future. we are on the path becoming europe and greece. you just can't keep borrowing money. there is a stunning and fiction in this country, and we need some sort of we need some serious intervention. in the book, what i attempt to do is take people to the presidents and leaders and tell you exactly because of the luxury of time and my publisher, simon & schuster, i declined to get the meeting notes to get the exact detail to interview president obama and speaker boehner and the key players in this. i just want to take one quick snapshot from what happened that we didn't know about, which is critical. when the cops pull up less when the president was upset, he called the congressional leaders on a saturday morning at 11:00 o'clock a.m. the democratic and republican leaders were trying to work out their own deal. harry reid, the democratic leader, said to the president,
unemployment and minimal hope for its improvement and also for increases in the debt and deficit. his job lts wislation proposals are not being well-received by republicans. the administration has not propose any innovative resolutions for the severe downturn in housing. some believe he should have supported and promoted simpson-bowles deficit reduction proposal. he has not bmeetin rtele to significantly expand economic opportunity. how has obamaarased the tobsls leadership? he attempts to communicate his vision and proposal but he has appeared so often on television that overeublosure was occurrinr he is a capable public speaker but his speeches lack the spirit he showed during his first campaign. he seems to lacversthe coficunication skills of fdr, reagan or clinton. obama frequen-by comes across as a teacher or a motivator and not a motivator. he fails frequen-by to excite and motivate the broad public he must reach though he is not doing badly in the current campaign. there is a recent article in a sunday edition of the newshorves times entitled to obama plays to win in politics and every
deficit right now. it is the bridge to renewable energy, renewable energy will take a long time. if we can move to gas we get tremendous benefits in terms of cleaner energy on the way to renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, steve, this would be transformational for our economy but we have not been able to act on these things even though i said earlier there is wide bipartisan -- >> thank you. let me just try to poke holes in this. if we rollback time to just before the financial crisis you look at the u.s. deposition. douglas holtz-eakin was out there talking about that already. and john mccain and others have been but it is much worse today but if you look at the deck in a different way, look at private sector debt, the fact, forget government debt. before the financial crisis private-sector debt was 160% of gdp in the united states and despite averaging, back to 160% of gdp we are still in crisis mode, you had structural corruption between regulators and financial institutions and any place in the economy and a private sector event that led to a government response
.m. majority whip dick durbin will talk about the so-called fiscal cliff and deficit reduction at the center for american progress. fiscal cliff, a combination of those expiring tax provisions and budget cuts that could take place the beginning of the new you. they include the bush-era tax cuts and sequestration. live coverage starts at 1130 eastern also on c-span. we are likely to about the fiscal cliff during the senate session today getting underway at 10 a.m. eastern, just over a half hour from now. after the gavel and majority leader reid will be recognized to speak and will likely outlined the schedule for the day which could include debate on defense programs and policy, and possibly legislation to do with equal rights, people with disabilities. centers will us from 12:30-2:15 eastern for weeks the party meetings. live coverage of the senate and members gavel in right here on c-span2. right now some debate from the floor of the senate yesterday between majority leader reid and republican leader mitch mcconnell. d, w they talkede about potentialit't changes to filibuster rules. here's
with a billion specified and the rest not and the 6 trillion-dollar deficit with the goal set up plus the one, 6 trillion-dollar tax increase or five particularly since the spending cuts have been agreed to by the democrats and obama included. he knows he is and for that and then the republicans offer to put them into subsequent savings from the budget control act. when they spent nine months discussion from simpson-bowles which is a tax increase and hints that the tax reform and its spending reform and when we finally went into the room to see what they came up with they didn't have legislative language that should have taken two weeks but they didn't have anything. they didn't have anything in nine months. why? because it isn't real. people say this imaginary agreement that isn't written down over the massive tax increase and the spending, simpson-bowles is a distraction from the fact that the two parties fundamentally disagree on the country, and this is where we have people who tell you why don't we have the good old days of bipartisan compromise telling you how old they are? because they ar
out of their pockets to his deficit reduction. so we've had thoughts of things squeezing us at different levels. we are now facing biggest threat through sequestered. janet mentioned the fiscal cliff in one part of the fiscal cliff is these across-the-board spending cuts to take effect january 2nd. it's going to be an 8.2% across-the-board cut in education, job training and health, housing, fbi, air traffic controllers from the food safety, entire range of domestic programs. for education if you count headstart, which is at the department of health and human services a $4.8 billion cut would be the largest education cuts ever in the history of the country. that would just move us -- essentially move us backwards on whether the goal is closing achievement gaps come increasing high school graduation rates, increasing college access and college completion. our biggest challenge in the short-term this lame-duck lame-duck session this to work together with groups like the urban league and national council to come up with a balanced approach to deficit reduction. as genocide, as p
will be a drain on the taxpayer and walk on torturing dollars deficit. ibm back ibm back thank you. i would like to know to which degree to think as the united nation but for the 21st century to political power in the hands of the green lobby. >> well, the u.n. has been very encouraging of the green lobby and the screen job issue is not an issue here in the united state. it is an issue also in europe being encouraged by the u.n., encouraged by the meeting over the summer. but europe is also finding green job aren't all they thought they would be. spain has stopped subsidies for solar power under that doesn't work in sunny spain it's not going to work anywhere. germany has also stopped at subsidies which is more understandable because there's a lot of clubs in germany, even though the economy isn't cloudy at all. the u.n. has had a strong influence on this. >> yes, sir. >> chuck bradford. you are probably not old enough to remember, the jimmy carter gave lots of money, billions of dollars to alternate energy projects. >> i do remember. >> too many of those plants still exist is the question? i do
. a growth strategy that's not delivery and a deficit that is rising. it is a government that is failing, a prime minister that is failing, and -- >> calm down, calm down. [shouting] >> he just can't keep his cool when he knows he is losing the argument, mr. speaker,. [shouting] and it's the british people are paying the price for his failure. [shouting] >> i think what we can see is the leadership that is a drowning. >> this scrap the jobs tax, enterprise the enterprise zone. that is funded one many apprenticeships, that is rebuilding our economy, that these 1 million more people in private sector work. we're putting the country back to work. their party reckitt. [shouting] >> thank you, mr. speaker. will the prime minister join me in congratulating the formula one team on winning the world championship for three years in a row? another fine example of british technological innovation. >> i'm delighted to praise and they traded to the formula one team based in his constituency, which sadly be the formula one team based in my constituency. but it is actually a remarkable fact that if you
that there is a relationship between guns and butter, that even though this is a wealthy nation, we cannot run deficits of a certain sort. we have to move the fighting and that would have consequences for his domestic program. he then johnson in the most liberal administration is very clear on this, that you just could not spend limitlessly and he knew that this war was going to impinge on his domestic agenda and virtually everybody. this is well understood. >> guest: it did. didn't really affect spending in 1965. i do want to maintain a 65 is the worst year of the war. not all that many americans actually died -- died in 1965. so if they say from 23,284,000 after 400,000, which was a terrible year, to 550,000 at the time johnson leaves office in 1969. so even that is not enough to win the war. >> that's fairly clear. what also strikes me as interesting is that we think of the war opposition as starting in a way in which there was no war, if there's no student there's no opposition to the war. but what is also striking in your book is how there was a kind of opposition to the war among the chattering c
control of the house. the tax cut deal, fights over the budget, the debt ceiling, deficit reduction, egypt, libya, and how obama's made the decision and took the actions he to go up but to explain how this is done to set up the 2012 campaign. he had a theory he could make the 2012 race a choice between different approaches to government and everything he did he tried to temper temper -- to other at to a choice. we did not know how things would end up on 2012 but i looked at his governing and elected strategy and it culminated. this is the back story of what happened in the presidential campaign. >> host: david corn. showdown is his most recent book that the national press club >> host: professor, we are here to talk about your book indispensable. i want to say this is a delightful book to read. you deal with very familiar figures. you attack them from some new angles. let's died 10. you have a quote but is attributed to different people also charles de gaulle is most often accredited. what does it mean? >> appropriately it has a dual meaning that people call them sells indispensable and th
revolution. we actually now have a path to energy independence in america, that's a $200 billion deficit right now. it's a bridge to renewable energy, renewable energy's going to take a long time. if we can move to gas, we'll get tremendous benefits in terms of cleaner energy on the way to renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, steve, this would be transformational for our economy. but we haven't been able to act on these things even though, as i said earlier, there's wide bipartisan consensus. >> thank you, michael. let me jump to doug and steve for a moment and just try to poke holes in this. if we roll back time to just before the financial crisis, you looked at the u.s. debt position, doug holtz-eakin was out there, you know, bitching about that already. [laughter] and john mccain and others had been. but it's much worse today. if you looked at debt in a different way, if you looked at private sector debt, if you looked at the fact -- forget government debt, but if you looked, government debt's gotten worse, but before the financial crisis, private sector debt wa
are at full strength for that 352,000 numbered. there's still a training deficit, so they're not all fully trained. there will be, then we some attrition there at the time and will be for the equipment. so there to bring that force to full capacity. >> i think from my perspective as a generator and trainer, doug will be a better witness as to the effect on the ground. i would merely highlight that in the early days, and this is a much afghan driven, we focus on quantity filling the gaps, putting the quantity out into the field. what we have started to do not in earnest is to consolidate that, by which i mean introduce more tactical training, very specifically introduced collective command level training kicks we bring that information headquarters from the field. we put them in package at the command, which placed -- to your initial question which helps to consolidate and improve the anf ability to fill the field. but it doesn't necessary, wouldn't necessary to keep me awake at night but i think it's a very obvious a challenge. it's the next step in developing the ansf. >> sounds so perfec
to energy independence in america. that's a $200 billion deficit right now. it's a bridge to renewable energy, renewable energy's going to take a long time. if we move to gas, there's tremendous benefits in terms a cleaner energy on the way to renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, steve, this would be transformational for the economy. we have not been able to act on these things even though, as i said earlier, that's wide con consensus on the directions. >> thank you, michael. jumping to doug and steve for a moment and just poke holes in this a second. if we roll back time just before the financial crisis, look at the u.s. debt position; douglas holtz-eakin out there bitching about that already, and john mckane and others had been, but it's worse today. if you look at debt in a different way, private sector debt, the fact that -- forget government debt, but government debt's worse, but before the financial crisis, private sector debt was 160% of gdp in the united states. despite the miss of deleveraging, we are back to 8% of gdp. we have a crisis mode, structural
, like deficit reduction. so nixon thought he was making a positive contribution that way. but nixon also disagreed with perot's protectionist and isolationist strains in his platform. and then perot exited the race and jumped back in, and this really disappointed nixon because he thought that perot was treating the presidential race as a game that was subject to his own caprices and his own whims. and so nixon thought that the country could not afford to have such an erratic character as a vice presidential or a presidential nominee. c-span: how did you go about getting random house to buy this book? >> guest: actually, i had worked with harry evans at random house on nixon's last book, "beyond peace." so i had somewhat of an association with him. and i let him know that i had several sample chapters done that mr. safire had read, and i had a simple outline for him, and would he be willing to read it? and he was, and he liked it, and so that's how it came to be c-span: and when did you start that process? >> guest: actually, i originally envisioned this book as a single volume. i thought
the only way we can solve our long-term debt and deficit problem is to fix and sustainable growth rate of our popular entitlement programs. the president has from time to time had an openness to die. not the time to actually do it and i hope we can put all this divisiveness behind us and build confidence in relationships on a bipartisan basis to look at there at the end of the year. >> the president and later read that social security should be off the table. was your reaction to that? >> all the entitlements need to be discussed because they ought to one degree or another on an unsustainable path. medicare is a more immediate danger. we went to see these programs and i understand the dilemma the president and majority leader have let their hard left doesn't want to change anything other. any dollar spent on a commitment made by the federal government on any program at any time out to be there in perpetuity. well, times change. until we make sure these popular entitlement programs at the demographics of the change in america, we can't save it. we all know that. it's simple math. what w
assume more and more responsibilities for the states with budget deficits in excess of $1 trillion, what we're going to do is find ourselves at a point where we're going to have to make cuts in programs that are our responsibility. so all i would ask to you do is think about whether or not this is truly a responsibility of the federal government and whether or not we ought to be expanding the program -- well-intentioned, does great work. don't discount that. well-deserved. don't discount that. but is it the responsibility of the federal government? i would actually state to the chairman -- and i'd be happy to have a voice vote on this and not force a vote, because i know the outcome, and we shouldn't waste everybody's time to do that. so with that, i would ask for the yeas and nays and a voice vote and vitiate the vote that's scheduled for 7:00 -- 6:00. the presiding officer: is there objection to that request? href i'm not sure i -- mr. levin: i'm not sure i understood what that request was. the presiding officer: the request was for a vote on the leahy amendment now -- the senator from
of leverage, or did this restrain american options in terms of what you can do? >> with respect to the deficit and debt of the national security liability, we need our senior leadership and the ability to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so, we have a requirement to do so. the requirement and foundation of national power is ultimately economic in terms of global influence. and in terms of supporting the military. we have, i think, members of the house will step up in the coming months. >> how did you look at your surplus of the united states? do they say that we have america under control because of the treasury? >> superposition to the united states is very important. it is very decisive. so there is no intention for us with this economic relationship. >> i'm going to open it up to the floor. we have four microphones around the room. josh grogan is over here. >> thank you very much, and thank you for your time today. i figure we can all agree that the number one issue of the risk of conflict with china is a large part of u.s. strategy encouraging this is to urge china to have a bette
officers, and teachers. and we're going to pay for that. no more deficit spending. we'll pay for it by having a surtax on people who make more than $1 million a year. and that surtax is .3%. they stopped it. they stopped it dead in its tracks. every republican voted against that. that is the way that they have legislated this entire year. and by our getting rid of the motion to proceed, that we're turning country upside-down is ridiculous. it's not true. they have legislated with the effort to defeat obama. he won. he won by 2 1/2 million votes, 325 -- 327 electoral votes, overwhelming. even though they did everything they could to stop him from being reelected. everyone knows what a failure this congress has been because of what the senate has done and that's nothing. nothing. no job creation. they didn't want that. it would -- if -- if we had had some ability to create jobs, it would have helped obama, it would have helped the country. but, no, that wasn't what they wanted to do. and a terrible day for them last year was the -- several months ago, the supreme court -- can y
't say al qaeda or iran or north korea, what he said was the debt and deficit. i think that is exactly right. above all, this is the future. we are not talking about a physical infrastructure, we are talking about our human infrastructure. joel klein is someone who has dedicated the most recent date of his multifaceted career to this. when he is in discovering the best restaurants in brooklyn, he is focused on improving the lot of young people in this country. mostly the other way around. some going to tell you about the time he has dedicated to this issue. about a year and a half ago, i called a condoleezza rice and i said i wanted to do something with me. and i said richard, don't even go there, and i said okay. and so i said before the end of this conversation, you are going to agree to what i'm going ask to ask you. and she said, no way. i said right. we spent a lot of time on all the traditional foreign-policy issues. we are focused on being domestic and what we want to do is report on education. we don't want a piece on everyone else has done. what we want to do is look at educat
he said was the deficit in the state of american society. i think that's exactly right. you can look at questions of the budget. you can look at questions of infrastructure. immigration policy. but above all, education policy. this is the future. we're not talking about her physical infrastructure. and joel klein is someone who's given his most recent phase of his multi-career when he discovers the best restaurants in brooklyn, is focused on improving a lot of young people in this country. it's supposed to be the other way around. so i'm going to tell you how condi has been dedicated to this issue. a year and a half ago i called her up and said convy, i want you to do some thing for me and with me. she said richard coming to b.c. don't even start. i said okay. i said before the end of this conversation come you're going to agree with going to ask you. and she said no way. i said with the council on foreign relations and all of our time working on things like china and mexico and all the traditional foreign-policy issues. we believe the agenda and all things domestic. but we want to d
. as a clinician that these kids and families and our clinics in seeing the major education deficit on the fields today in all sports frankly, but also seeing the outcomes. some of the things that raise talking about in terms of understanding forces is really important and we just completed some work in developing measures they are using so we can understand their cognitive symptom kinds of effects of these to kids. i think that's very, very important outcome to what we need to link up with the games. from the perspective -- actually was at the aspen institute this summer, where u.s. nabobs question about, should we be eliminating football -- tackling a football before the age of 14. at that point i couldn't speak, although we did speak that night. one of the things i said as we've got to change things. in its current form of credit problem. although the age limit is something that has to be further studied here it is going to finish my comments with research, but maybe starts with research in trying to understand what evidence do we have. one of the things that is hopeful that i've seen in sport
that these kids and families and our clinics in seeing the major education deficit on the fields today in all sports frankly, but also seeing the outcomes. some of the things that raise talking about in terms of understanding forces is really important and we just completed some work in developing measures they are using so we can understand their cognitive symptom kinds of effects of these to kids. i think that's very, very important outcome to what we need to link up with the games. from the perspective -- actually was at the aspen institute this summer, where u.s. nabobs question about, should we be eliminating football -- tackling a football before the age of 14. at that point i couldn't speak, although we did speak that night. one of the things i said as we've got to change things. in its current form of credit problem. although the age limit is something that has to be further studied here it is going to finish my comments with research, but maybe starts with research in trying to understand what evidence do we have. one of the things that is hopeful that i've seen in sports like footba
to reduce the deficit. the question is how to do it. this is an encouraging development. it suggests that republicans are slowly absorbing one of the lessons of the 2012 election which as elections continue to be wown wop in the middle and victory remains elusive for parties that occupy either the far left over the far right. over the years the democratic party has wrestled with the same issues republicans are facing. when i was elected to congress in 1981, crime was ripping apart my district district. i came to washington with a goal of working to pass new laws to crack down on crime. lo and behold i found the democratic congress at the time was literally outsourcing the drafting of crime legislation to the aclu. i have great respect for the views of civil libertarians but at that time the motto was -- quote -- "let a hundred guilty people foe free lest your convict one guilty person." that dominated our party's thinking on crime for better than a decade. our party suffered for it. we didn't standpoint snap out of it until president clinton passed the crime bill in the 1990's. after
is this is a responsible bipartisan bill that will reduce the deficit by $5 million while expanding hunting and fishing opportunities for millions of americans. now, i appreciate the perspective of the ranking member of the budget committee on the issue of whether to raise a point of order or not. i know he has to defend the budget act. however, the reality is this, this bill reduces the debt by $5 million over ten years. those aren't my figures. those are the figures of the congressional budget office. and unfortunately a vote to sustain senator sessions' point of order is a vote to kill this important bipartisan legislation. now we've already had plenty of partisanship already here today on the senate floor. i think it's time to do something in a bipartisan fashion and do something that is good for some 90 million americans who consider themselves hunters and anglers. i urge my colleagues to waive the budget point of order and then approve this important bill. with that, mr. president i yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum ca
the budget and the debt ceiling and deficit reduction, also what happened in egypt and libya. and so i'm looking at how obama made the decisions he made and why did the actions he took. and a very perilous time politically but also explain how this is all done in a way, set up a 2012 campaign that we
are at full strength for the 352,000 number. there still are training deficit. they are not all fully trained and there will be some attrition at the time. so it's tough to bring the force to capacity. >> from my good as a generator and trainer to the national spectrum if he will double us to the effect on the ground. i would merely highlight that in the early days, this is very much afghan treatment, we focused on quantity, filling the gaps, putting quantity out into the field. what we've started to do now in earnest is consolidate that by which i mean introduce my tactical training and specifically introduce collective command level training so we bring the formation from the field, put them to repackage, which is hopes to consolidate and improve the ansf ability. but it wouldn't necessarily keep me awake at night, but it's a very obvious challenge. it's the next step in developing the ansf. >> it all sounds so perfect. everything is just as it should. >> it doesn't keep you awake at night? >> i can run a herb range of operation issues, but in ansf, what is really important to me is the men
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